Living Well / Increasing Adult Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Living Well / Increasing the Ability to Find Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in the Neighborhood2021-03-26T05:21:03+00:00

Not eating enough fruits and vegetables contributes to poor health and risk of chronic disease1

Currently only 28% of Californians meet the standard of eating fruits and vegetables five times a day.2 Research indicates that many chronic conditions including diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol can be treated, controlled and in some cases reversed with proper diet. Over the past 30 years, caloric intake nationwide has increased significantly. On average Americans consume more than 300 more calories per day than they did in 1985.3 Let’s Get Healthy California seeks to increase fruit and vegetable consumption from 28% to 34% by 2022.

Indicator Progress

In 2012 (baseline year), 28.0% of adults met the recommended intake of fruits and vegetables. Current data is pending. We hope to reach a target of 34.0% or higher by 2022.

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More Data

Baseline

28.0%

Current Rate

Pending

Target

34.0%

Indicator Highlights

Ending Hunger in Orange County (OC)

Orange County experiences a unique disparity in which it ranks sixth in highest median income statewide, while also ranking ninth nationwide in counties with the highest number of people facing food insecurity. This program fosters nontraditional partnerships between public health, the food supply/restaurant community, and medical providers to divert unused quality food from areas of excess to areas of need, while identifying and referring food-insecure community members. This program feeds vulnerable residents while promoting environmental stewardship, and has made lasting change by embracing current technology and building sustainable partnerships. Read more »

Disparities & Trends

The data source for the indicator on adult daily intake of fruits and vegetables is no longer available. Related data on access to fresh fruits and vegetables is included in the Healthy Communities goal area.

Many Californians live in neighborhoods with an abundance of cheap, low-nutrient, high-calorie food, but with limited access to affordable fresh fruits and vegetables. This is magnified for low-income families who must often travel miles from their neighborhood to purchase healthy foods at reasonable prices.

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The data source for this indicator is no longer available. Related data on access to fresh fruits and vegetables is included in the Healthy Communities goal area.

1. Office of Health Equity. (August 2015). Portrait of Promise: California Statewide Plan to Promote Health Equity and Mental Health Equity. California Department of Public Health. http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Documents/CDPHOHEDisparityReportAug2015.pdf

2. Let’ Get Healthy California Task Force. (December 2012). Lets Get Healthy California Task Force Final Report. Let’s Get Healthy California Task Force., http://www.chhs.ca.gov/pages/LGHCTF.aspx

3. Peck, C., Logan, J., Malzlish, N., & Van Court, J. (n.d.). The Burden of Chronic Disease. Retrieved November 16, 2015, from www.cdph.ca.gov: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Documents/BurdenReportOnline%2004-04-13.pdf

4. California Department of Public Health, California Obesity Prevention Program. (2010). 2010 California Obesity Prevention Plan: A Vision for Tomorrow, Strategic Actions for. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from www.cdph.ca.gov: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/COPP/Documents/COPP-ObesityPreventionPlan-2010.pdf.pdf

Stories & Solutions

Ending Hunger in Orange County (OC)

Orange County experiences a unique disparity in which it ranks sixth in highest median income statewide, while also ranking ninth nationwide in counties with the highest number of people facing food insecurity.

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