Healthy Beginnings / Reducing Childhood Obesity

Reducing Childhood Obesity2021-06-28T20:05:40+00:00

Obese youth are at greater risk for health problems, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, early maturation, and joint problems.1

Obese youth are likely to be obese in adulthood. Recently, several chronic diseases which had originally been considered “adult onset” are now appearing at younger ages, including type 2 diabetes and elevated blood pressure. This indicator measures the number of adolescents (12-17 years old) who are overweight or obese (using the height-to-weight ratio), and the number of children (0-11 years old) who are overweight for each age level.

Children Overweight for Age (0-5 Years Old)

In 2009 (baseline year), 10.9% of children (0-5 years old) were overweight for their age (heights were not available). The most recent data available show 20.2% (2016). We hope to reach a target of 9.0% or lower by 2022.

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Children Overweight for Age (0-5 Years Old)

Caution: The baseline has changed from the original LGHC 2012 Task Force Report due to changes in survey methodology of the data source in 2014.

Baseline

10.9%

Current Rate

20.2%

Target

9.0%

Children Overweight for Age (6-11 Years Old)

In 2009 (baseline year), 12.2% of children (6-11 years old) were overweight for their age (heights were not available). The most recent data available show 12.9% (2016). We hope to reach a target of 8.0% or lower by 2022.

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Baseline

12.2%

Current Rate

12.9%

Target

8.0%

Adolescent Obesity (12-17 Years Old)

In 2009 (baseline year), 28.5% of adolescents (12-17 years old) were overweight or obese. The most recent data available show 40.7% (2016). We hope to reach a target of 19.0% or lower by 2022.

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Adolescent Obesity (12-17 Years Old)

Caution: The baseline has changed from the original LGHC 2012 Task Force Report due to changes in survey methodology of the data source in 2011. The target has been updated accordingly.

Baseline

28.5%

Current Rate

40.7%

Target

19.0%

Indicator Highlights

Image of some kids playing soccer in a grassy field

Collaborative Partnerships and Environments for Early Childhood Health

HAB45 strives to prevent early childhood obesity among low-income children ages 0-5.  Through collaboration with multiple organizations, HAB45 promotes quality parks, healthy eating, physical activity, breastfeeding, and reduction of screen time. Learn more »

Proportion of Children or Adolescents Who are Obese or Overweight, Over Time

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Proportion of Children or Adolescents Who are Obese or Overweight, by Demographic Category


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Indicator: Proportion of children (subcategories 0-5 years and 6-11 years) who are overweight for age, and adolescents (12-17 years) who are obese or overweight.

Description:  For children, “overweight for age” was pulled from CHIS, which does not factor height and therefore cannot be equated with BMI. Children who are overweight for their age should not be considered “obese or overweight.” For adolescents, four-category BMI was pulled from CHIS, but that is not the same as child “overweight for age.”

Data Limitations: Asked of California’s residential population (teens and children), administered in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Does not include those living in group quarters or homeless persons.

Indicator Source: California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) is an annual (starting in 2015; previously biennial) population-based, omnibus health survey of California. It is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the country. Note that this indicator uses weighted data.

Data Sharing Agreement: Researchers can access a variety of publicly available CHIS data files and web tools. These CHIS data products include downloadable data sets and easy-to-read documents. In addition, local county health departments can request data files specific to their county. However, researchers can apply to analyze confidential CHIS data, data sensitive variables and/or geo-coded data through the CHIS Data Access Center (DAC). Access to confidential CHIS data requires a research application, review, and approval.

Indicator Calculation Methodology: http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/chis/design/Pages/overview.aspx, calculation for children “overweight for age” https://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/charts.htm

Data Collection Methodology: http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/chis/design/Pages/methodology.aspx

Program URL Link: http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/chis/Pages/default.aspx

1. California Endowment. (2015, February). Community Safety: A Building Block for Community Health . The Prevention Institute. From http://www.preventioninstitute.org/component/jlibrary/article/id-363/127.html2. Prevention Institute . (2015, March). Safety in All Policies: Multi-Sector Actions for a Safer California . Retrieved January 8, 2016, from: http://www.preventioninstitute.org/component/jlibrary/article/id-364/127.html

3. Center for Disease Control and Prevention . (August 2014). Connecting the Dots: An Overview of the Links among Multiple Forms of Violence. The Prevention Institute.

4. Michelle Liberman, S. Z. (2015). Safe Routes to School. Oakland, CA: Safe Routes to School National Partnership. From http://www.ncdsv.org/images/SafeStates_PreventingViolenceRolesForPublicHealthAgencies_10-2011.pdf

5. Prevention Institute. (2011, May). Fact Sheets: Links Between Violence and Chronic Diseases, Mental Illness and Poor Learning. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from http://www.preventioninstitute.org/component/jlibrary/article/id-363/127.html

6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . (2014, October 22). Injury Prevention & Control : Division of Violence Prevention . Retrieved January 8, 2016, from: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/opportunities-for-action.html

7. Schweig, S. (2014, March). Healthy Communities May Make Safe Communities: Public Health Approaches to Violence Prevention. Retrieved January 8, 2016, from: http://nij.gov/journals/273/Pages/violence-prevention.aspx

8. Agency for Toxic Substances and Abuse Registry . (2015, June 25). Models and Frameworks for the Practice of Community Engagement. Retrieved January 16, 2016, from: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/communityengagement/pce_models.html

9. UNITY. (n.d.). Multi-Sector Collaboration. Retrieved January 8, 2016, from: http://www.preventioninstitute.org/unity-resources/multi-sector-collaboration.html

10. California Strategic Growth Council. (n.d.). California Health in All Polices Task Force. Retrieved December 11, 2015, from: http://www.sgc.ca.gov/s_abouthiaptaskforce.php

11. Prevention Institute. (2011, September). Fact Sheet: Links Between Violence and Health Equity. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from: http://www.preventioninstitute.org/component/jlibrary/article/id-311/127.html

12. Prevention Institute. (2010, May ). Addressing the Intersection: Preventing Violence and Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from: http://www.preventioninstitute.org/component/jlibrary/article/id-267/127.html

13. Office of Health Equity. (2015, August). Portrait of Promise: California Statewide Plan to Promote Health Equity and Mental Health Equity. California Department of Public Health.

14. Lieberman, M., & Zimmerman, S. (n.d.). Taking Back the Streets & Sidewalks. Retrieved December 11, 2015, from: http://saferoutespartnership.org/sites/default/files/pdf/Taking Back-the-Streets-and-Sidewalks.pdf

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